Calendar

Aug
19
Sat
Iaido & Kenjutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 19 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi

Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Iaijutsu is the Japanese martial art of swordsmanship which emphasizes drawing and cutting with the samurai sword (called a ‘katana’) in a single fluid motion. Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu is a ‘koryu bujutsu’ (which means ‘traditional martial art’) with a direct lineage back over 450 years to its founder, Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu, who developed this particular style of swordsmanship.

Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Lineage

The current and 20th headmaster of our branch of Iaido is Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi, Jyudan (10th dan black belt) and founder of the Nippon Kobudo Jikishin-kai (Japanese Ancient Weapons True Spirit Association).

The Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai continues the tradition of Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu iai-jutsu outside of Japan under the instruction of Masayuki Shimabukuro, Hanshi, hachidan (8th dan black belt). Shimabukuro Sensei is a direct student of Miura Sensei and has studied Iaido (Iaijutsu) for over 30 years.

MJER Lineage

Click To Enlarge Image

The Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai honbu dojo emphasizes traditional practice and application of the techniques in the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu curriculum. This curriculum encompasses the practice of waza(solo techniques of which there are over 40), katachi (paired patterns using a wood sword or ‘bokken’), and also tameshigiri (test cutting using a live/sharp sword on rolled mats). These three components serve to reinforce and improve the other to make the student of iai-jutsu aware of proper body mechanics, focus, and technique for the effective use of the sword. All three of these, plus the integral observance and practice of sincere etiquette make up the core curriculum at Sakura Budokan.

Iaido requires extreme precision of its techniques and demands tremendous concentration during practice-both of which ask a great deal of self-discipline and sincere personal commitment on the part of the student in order to master. As a reward for these efforts, it can offer the individual a lifetime of physical, mental, and spiritual growth, as well as an enlightened and peaceful state of mind.

If you would like to learn more about Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Iaijutsu and the benefits of its practice, please call or E-Mail us

Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi

Jodo & Kenjutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 19 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

jodosmall

Kyoshi Long and Hanshi Shimabukuro

Jojutsu in Tsuwano, Japan

 

History of Shindo Muso-ryu Jojutsu

Shindo Muso-ryu was founded circa 1605 by Muso Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi, following a pilgrimage he went on through the country (shugyo). This pilgrimage was meant to be lived as a drastic asceticism, consequence of his defeat against the famous Miyamoto Musashi.He had managed to get to the deepest of the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto-Ryu tradition and practice (okugi). It was indeed because he had been defeated following a long series of victories in duels, that this warrior entered asceticism. This latter lead him to the Kamado sanctuary, on Mount Homan, in the current Fukuoka state where, after remaining confined for 37 nights and days, he reached illumination (satori). He then was able to create the Jo techniques which allowed him to defeat Miyamoto Musashi during a new duel.

“maruki o motte suigetsu o shire” or “take a round stick, and find the solar plexus”

Gonnosuke became responsible for teaching the jojutsu for the Kuroda clan. This tradition was jealously kept secret within the clan as its official secret tradition (otome bujutsu) until the Meiji restoration (1868), when the interdiction to teach this technique outside the clan was waived.

In 1940, Shimizu Takaji sensei (the last soke) changed the name of the tradition from Shindo Muso-ryu jojutsu to Shindo Muso-ryu jodo, this latter reflecting better the change of the art, in full agreement with the new orientation of the modern society.

The Shindo Muso-ryu curriculum

During the part of his life that Muso Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi devoted to teach Jo to the warriors of the Kuroda clan, he delivered teaching licenses to a dozen warriors. Either some of them, or their successors, were also masters in other martial traditions which were progressively integrated into the overall curriculum of Shindo Muso-ryu jodo.Even if these associated traditions kept their own technical specificities, they are taught as coherent parts of a unique curriculum.Nowadays, the complete martial education of a member of Shindo Muso-ryu comprehends the mastery of the 6 following traditions :

Shindo Muso-ryu jodo (stick)

Uchida-ryu tanjojutsu (short stick)

Kasumi Shinto-ryu kenjutsu (sword)

Isshin-ryu kusarigamajutsu (sickle with a chain)

Ikkaku-ryu juttejutsu (short single forked truncheon)

Ittatsu-ryu hojo jutsu (restricting rope)

Our training at Sakura Budokan includes all aspects of Shindo Muso Ryu Jojutsu. We are a certIfied dojo affiliated with the Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai and the Dai Nippon Butoku Kai. These two federations provide our Jodo rank and title certifications through the hombu in Osaka and Kyoto, Japan.

Aug
21
Mon
Adult Karate-do @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 21 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Strength – Determination – Success

Adult Karate for Men & Women

Shorin Ryu Karate

Karate-do is a Japanese term which generally translates as “Empty Hand Way.” Although Karate-do is known to be an effective form of self-defense, it is also an equally effective form of mental and physical self-improvement, for adults and children alike. Through regular Karate-do training, the mind and body work together to become a unified force for self-protection. Karate-do training also provides vigorous exercise from which one can improve muscular and cardiovascular development as well as improving balance, coordination and reflexes.

Okinawan/Japanese Karatedo

Karate was developed more than 750 years ago on the island of Okinawa by the Okinawan middle class. Based upon natural law (understanding body movement) Shorin Ryu is a complete art that trains both the body and mind.

Chinese martial arts began spreading to Okinawa in the 14th century, but it was not prominent until the 18th century, when Kusanku, a Chinese military official, visited Okinawa and gave a demonstration. In subsequent visits, he started teaching “chuan fa” (meaning “fist way”) to Okinawans

Kanga Sakukawa blended Kusanku’s chuan fa with Tode, the indigenous Okinawan martial art, to form the first martial art style called karate. His student Sokon Matsumura blended Sakukawa’s style with Shaolin kung fu to form Shorin-ryu karate. Matsumura began teaching his unique fighting methods to the bushi of Okinawa and many of the local men. “Bushi” Matsumora, became Anko Itosu’s primary instructor, and both Matsumura and Itosu instructed  Chotoku Kyan,  Choki Motobu, and many of the founders of the Shorin branches that exist today. Several of Kyan’s students would go on to lead their own branches of karate. Among those students were: Shoshin Nagamine (Matsubayashi-ryu), Tatsuo Shimabukuro (Isshin-ryu), Eizo Shimabukuro (Shobayashi-Ryu), Joen Nakazato (Shorinji-ryu), and Zenryo Shimabukuro (Chubu Shorin-ryu).

The Shorin Ryu of Eizo Shimabukuro as taught at Sakura Budokan was brought to the USA in 1962 by one of Shimabukuro’s personal students, John Nash. Our Shorin Ryu at Sakura Budokan reflects the original teachings that were brought back in 1962 as well as the influences of other Okinawan and Japanese teachers that have added to our understanding over the past 50 years.

Students of all belt levels train together to learn the escaping, controlling and defensive arts through the application of kicks, hand strikes, joint locks, throws, and true self-defense techniques. Modern and traditional weaponry (Bo, Sai, Tonfa, Kama and Nunchaku) is also taught.

 

SLKobudoSmall

“Only a Warrior can choose pacifism. All others are condemned to it.”


Aug
22
Tue
Adult Karate-do @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Strength – Determination – Success

Adult Karate for Men & Women

Shorin Ryu Karate

Karate-do is a Japanese term which generally translates as “Empty Hand Way.” Although Karate-do is known to be an effective form of self-defense, it is also an equally effective form of mental and physical self-improvement, for adults and children alike. Through regular Karate-do training, the mind and body work together to become a unified force for self-protection. Karate-do training also provides vigorous exercise from which one can improve muscular and cardiovascular development as well as improving balance, coordination and reflexes.

Okinawan/Japanese Karatedo

Karate was developed more than 750 years ago on the island of Okinawa by the Okinawan middle class. Based upon natural law (understanding body movement) Shorin Ryu is a complete art that trains both the body and mind.

Chinese martial arts began spreading to Okinawa in the 14th century, but it was not prominent until the 18th century, when Kusanku, a Chinese military official, visited Okinawa and gave a demonstration. In subsequent visits, he started teaching “chuan fa” (meaning “fist way”) to Okinawans

Kanga Sakukawa blended Kusanku’s chuan fa with Tode, the indigenous Okinawan martial art, to form the first martial art style called karate. His student Sokon Matsumura blended Sakukawa’s style with Shaolin kung fu to form Shorin-ryu karate. Matsumura began teaching his unique fighting methods to the bushi of Okinawa and many of the local men. “Bushi” Matsumora, became Anko Itosu’s primary instructor, and both Matsumura and Itosu instructed  Chotoku Kyan,  Choki Motobu, and many of the founders of the Shorin branches that exist today. Several of Kyan’s students would go on to lead their own branches of karate. Among those students were: Shoshin Nagamine (Matsubayashi-ryu), Tatsuo Shimabukuro (Isshin-ryu), Eizo Shimabukuro (Shobayashi-Ryu), Joen Nakazato (Shorinji-ryu), and Zenryo Shimabukuro (Chubu Shorin-ryu).

The Shorin Ryu of Eizo Shimabukuro as taught at Sakura Budokan was brought to the USA in 1962 by one of Shimabukuro’s personal students, John Nash. Our Shorin Ryu at Sakura Budokan reflects the original teachings that were brought back in 1962 as well as the influences of other Okinawan and Japanese teachers that have added to our understanding over the past 50 years.

Students of all belt levels train together to learn the escaping, controlling and defensive arts through the application of kicks, hand strikes, joint locks, throws, and true self-defense techniques. Modern and traditional weaponry (Bo, Sai, Tonfa, Kama and Nunchaku) is also taught.

 

SLKobudoSmall

“Only a Warrior can choose pacifism. All others are condemned to it.”


Jodo & Kenjutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

jodosmall

Kyoshi Long and Hanshi Shimabukuro

Jojutsu in Tsuwano, Japan

 

History of Shindo Muso-ryu Jojutsu

Shindo Muso-ryu was founded circa 1605 by Muso Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi, following a pilgrimage he went on through the country (shugyo). This pilgrimage was meant to be lived as a drastic asceticism, consequence of his defeat against the famous Miyamoto Musashi.He had managed to get to the deepest of the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto-Ryu tradition and practice (okugi). It was indeed because he had been defeated following a long series of victories in duels, that this warrior entered asceticism. This latter lead him to the Kamado sanctuary, on Mount Homan, in the current Fukuoka state where, after remaining confined for 37 nights and days, he reached illumination (satori). He then was able to create the Jo techniques which allowed him to defeat Miyamoto Musashi during a new duel.

“maruki o motte suigetsu o shire” or “take a round stick, and find the solar plexus”

Gonnosuke became responsible for teaching the jojutsu for the Kuroda clan. This tradition was jealously kept secret within the clan as its official secret tradition (otome bujutsu) until the Meiji restoration (1868), when the interdiction to teach this technique outside the clan was waived.

In 1940, Shimizu Takaji sensei (the last soke) changed the name of the tradition from Shindo Muso-ryu jojutsu to Shindo Muso-ryu jodo, this latter reflecting better the change of the art, in full agreement with the new orientation of the modern society.

The Shindo Muso-ryu curriculum

During the part of his life that Muso Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi devoted to teach Jo to the warriors of the Kuroda clan, he delivered teaching licenses to a dozen warriors. Either some of them, or their successors, were also masters in other martial traditions which were progressively integrated into the overall curriculum of Shindo Muso-ryu jodo.Even if these associated traditions kept their own technical specificities, they are taught as coherent parts of a unique curriculum.Nowadays, the complete martial education of a member of Shindo Muso-ryu comprehends the mastery of the 6 following traditions :

Shindo Muso-ryu jodo (stick)

Uchida-ryu tanjojutsu (short stick)

Kasumi Shinto-ryu kenjutsu (sword)

Isshin-ryu kusarigamajutsu (sickle with a chain)

Ikkaku-ryu juttejutsu (short single forked truncheon)

Ittatsu-ryu hojo jutsu (restricting rope)

Our training at Sakura Budokan includes all aspects of Shindo Muso Ryu Jojutsu. We are a certIfied dojo affiliated with the Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai and the Dai Nippon Butoku Kai. These two federations provide our Jodo rank and title certifications through the hombu in Osaka and Kyoto, Japan.

Aikibudo/Aikijujutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

 

What is Aikido and Aikijujutsu?

“Whenever I move, that’s Aikido.”- O’Sensei Morihei Ueshiba.

Aikido is a modern Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba (often referred to by his title ‘O Sensei’ or ‘Great Teacher’) a student of Sogaku Takeda, Soke of Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Morihei Ueshiba practiced his art as Daito Ryu and Aiki Budo for many years. His official association with Daito-ryu continued until 1937. However, in those later years, Ueshiba had already begun to distance himself from Takeda and the Daito-ryu. At that time Ueshiba was referring to his martial art as “Aiki Budo.” It is unclear exactly when Ueshiba began using the name “aikido”, but it became the official name of the art in 1942 when the Greater Japan Martial Virtue Society (Dai Nippon Butoku Kai) was engaged in a government sponsored reorganization and centralization of Japanese martial arts. At this time the art of Aikido became uniquely associated with teachings of Morihei Ueshiba.

  On a purely physical level it is an art involving some throws and joint locks that are derived from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu and some throws and other techniques derived from Kenjutsu. Aikido focuses not on punching or kicking opponents, but rather on using their own energy to gain control of them or to throw them away from you. It is not a static art, but places great emphasis on motion and the dynamics of movement.

Aiki-jujutsu is a form that can be broken into three styles: Jujutsu (hard/ soft); Aiki no Jutsu (soft); and Aikijujutsu (soft) which is the combination of the former two. Modern Japanese Jujutsu and Aikido both are styles that originate in Aikijujutsu. It emphasizes “an early neutralization of an attack.” Like other forms of jujutsu, it emphasizes throwing techniques and joint manipulations to effectively control, subdue, or injure an attacker. Of particular importance is the timing of a defensive technique to either blend or neutralize an incoming attack’s effectiveness and use the force of the attacker’s movement against them. Aikijujutsu is characterized by ample use of atemi, or the striking of vital areas, in order to set up jointlocking or throwing tactics.Some of the art’s striking methods employ the swinging of the outstretched arms to create power and to hit with the fists at deceptive angles, as may be observed in techniques such as the atemi that sets up gyaku ude-dori (reverse elbow lock). Many regard one of the unique characteristics of the art to be its preference for controlling a downed attacker’s joints with one’s knee or advanced cramping techniques in order to leave one’s hands free to access one’s weapons or to deal with the threat of other oncoming attackers.

Upon closer examination, most people will find in Aiki related arts what they are looking for, whether it is applicable self-defense technique, spiritual enlightenment, physical health or peace of mind. Aikido emphasizes the moral and spiritual aspects of this art, placing great weight on the development of harmony and peace. “The Way of Harmony of the Spirit” is one way that “Aikido” may be translated into English. Aikijujutsu stresses the combative roots of the modern art. Although different styles emphasize the more spiritual aspects to greater or lesser degrees, all of them are practiced with a spirit of cooperation and respect for ones training partner. The idea of a martial discipline striving for peace and harmony may seem paradoxical, however it is the most basic tenet of the art.

Here at Sakura Budokan we study, research and explore the traditional and modern forms of Aikijujutsu and Aikido through the KNBK and DNBK as well as its original methods through teachers of the Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu Kodokai.

Aug
23
Wed
Adult Karate-do @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Strength – Determination – Success

Adult Karate for Men & Women

Shorin Ryu Karate

Karate-do is a Japanese term which generally translates as “Empty Hand Way.” Although Karate-do is known to be an effective form of self-defense, it is also an equally effective form of mental and physical self-improvement, for adults and children alike. Through regular Karate-do training, the mind and body work together to become a unified force for self-protection. Karate-do training also provides vigorous exercise from which one can improve muscular and cardiovascular development as well as improving balance, coordination and reflexes.

Okinawan/Japanese Karatedo

Karate was developed more than 750 years ago on the island of Okinawa by the Okinawan middle class. Based upon natural law (understanding body movement) Shorin Ryu is a complete art that trains both the body and mind.

Chinese martial arts began spreading to Okinawa in the 14th century, but it was not prominent until the 18th century, when Kusanku, a Chinese military official, visited Okinawa and gave a demonstration. In subsequent visits, he started teaching “chuan fa” (meaning “fist way”) to Okinawans

Kanga Sakukawa blended Kusanku’s chuan fa with Tode, the indigenous Okinawan martial art, to form the first martial art style called karate. His student Sokon Matsumura blended Sakukawa’s style with Shaolin kung fu to form Shorin-ryu karate. Matsumura began teaching his unique fighting methods to the bushi of Okinawa and many of the local men. “Bushi” Matsumora, became Anko Itosu’s primary instructor, and both Matsumura and Itosu instructed  Chotoku Kyan,  Choki Motobu, and many of the founders of the Shorin branches that exist today. Several of Kyan’s students would go on to lead their own branches of karate. Among those students were: Shoshin Nagamine (Matsubayashi-ryu), Tatsuo Shimabukuro (Isshin-ryu), Eizo Shimabukuro (Shobayashi-Ryu), Joen Nakazato (Shorinji-ryu), and Zenryo Shimabukuro (Chubu Shorin-ryu).

The Shorin Ryu of Eizo Shimabukuro as taught at Sakura Budokan was brought to the USA in 1962 by one of Shimabukuro’s personal students, John Nash. Our Shorin Ryu at Sakura Budokan reflects the original teachings that were brought back in 1962 as well as the influences of other Okinawan and Japanese teachers that have added to our understanding over the past 50 years.

Students of all belt levels train together to learn the escaping, controlling and defensive arts through the application of kicks, hand strikes, joint locks, throws, and true self-defense techniques. Modern and traditional weaponry (Bo, Sai, Tonfa, Kama and Nunchaku) is also taught.

 

SLKobudoSmall

“Only a Warrior can choose pacifism. All others are condemned to it.”


Iaido & Kenjutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 23 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi

Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Iaijutsu is the Japanese martial art of swordsmanship which emphasizes drawing and cutting with the samurai sword (called a ‘katana’) in a single fluid motion. Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu is a ‘koryu bujutsu’ (which means ‘traditional martial art’) with a direct lineage back over 450 years to its founder, Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu, who developed this particular style of swordsmanship.

Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Lineage

The current and 20th headmaster of our branch of Iaido is Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi, Jyudan (10th dan black belt) and founder of the Nippon Kobudo Jikishin-kai (Japanese Ancient Weapons True Spirit Association).

The Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai continues the tradition of Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu iai-jutsu outside of Japan under the instruction of Masayuki Shimabukuro, Hanshi, hachidan (8th dan black belt). Shimabukuro Sensei is a direct student of Miura Sensei and has studied Iaido (Iaijutsu) for over 30 years.

MJER Lineage

Click To Enlarge Image

The Kokusai Nippon Budo Kai honbu dojo emphasizes traditional practice and application of the techniques in the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu curriculum. This curriculum encompasses the practice of waza(solo techniques of which there are over 40), katachi (paired patterns using a wood sword or ‘bokken’), and also tameshigiri (test cutting using a live/sharp sword on rolled mats). These three components serve to reinforce and improve the other to make the student of iai-jutsu aware of proper body mechanics, focus, and technique for the effective use of the sword. All three of these, plus the integral observance and practice of sincere etiquette make up the core curriculum at Sakura Budokan.

Iaido requires extreme precision of its techniques and demands tremendous concentration during practice-both of which ask a great deal of self-discipline and sincere personal commitment on the part of the student in order to master. As a reward for these efforts, it can offer the individual a lifetime of physical, mental, and spiritual growth, as well as an enlightened and peaceful state of mind.

If you would like to learn more about Muso Jikiden Eishin-Ryu Iaijutsu and the benefits of its practice, please call or E-Mail us

Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Hanshi

Aug
24
Thu
Adult Karate-do @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 24 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Strength – Determination – Success

Adult Karate for Men & Women

Shorin Ryu Karate

Karate-do is a Japanese term which generally translates as “Empty Hand Way.” Although Karate-do is known to be an effective form of self-defense, it is also an equally effective form of mental and physical self-improvement, for adults and children alike. Through regular Karate-do training, the mind and body work together to become a unified force for self-protection. Karate-do training also provides vigorous exercise from which one can improve muscular and cardiovascular development as well as improving balance, coordination and reflexes.

Okinawan/Japanese Karatedo

Karate was developed more than 750 years ago on the island of Okinawa by the Okinawan middle class. Based upon natural law (understanding body movement) Shorin Ryu is a complete art that trains both the body and mind.

Chinese martial arts began spreading to Okinawa in the 14th century, but it was not prominent until the 18th century, when Kusanku, a Chinese military official, visited Okinawa and gave a demonstration. In subsequent visits, he started teaching “chuan fa” (meaning “fist way”) to Okinawans

Kanga Sakukawa blended Kusanku’s chuan fa with Tode, the indigenous Okinawan martial art, to form the first martial art style called karate. His student Sokon Matsumura blended Sakukawa’s style with Shaolin kung fu to form Shorin-ryu karate. Matsumura began teaching his unique fighting methods to the bushi of Okinawa and many of the local men. “Bushi” Matsumora, became Anko Itosu’s primary instructor, and both Matsumura and Itosu instructed  Chotoku Kyan,  Choki Motobu, and many of the founders of the Shorin branches that exist today. Several of Kyan’s students would go on to lead their own branches of karate. Among those students were: Shoshin Nagamine (Matsubayashi-ryu), Tatsuo Shimabukuro (Isshin-ryu), Eizo Shimabukuro (Shobayashi-Ryu), Joen Nakazato (Shorinji-ryu), and Zenryo Shimabukuro (Chubu Shorin-ryu).

The Shorin Ryu of Eizo Shimabukuro as taught at Sakura Budokan was brought to the USA in 1962 by one of Shimabukuro’s personal students, John Nash. Our Shorin Ryu at Sakura Budokan reflects the original teachings that were brought back in 1962 as well as the influences of other Okinawan and Japanese teachers that have added to our understanding over the past 50 years.

Students of all belt levels train together to learn the escaping, controlling and defensive arts through the application of kicks, hand strikes, joint locks, throws, and true self-defense techniques. Modern and traditional weaponry (Bo, Sai, Tonfa, Kama and Nunchaku) is also taught.

 

SLKobudoSmall

“Only a Warrior can choose pacifism. All others are condemned to it.”


Aikibudo/Aikijujutsu @ Sakura Budokan
Aug 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

 

What is Aikido and Aikijujutsu?

“Whenever I move, that’s Aikido.”- O’Sensei Morihei Ueshiba.

Aikido is a modern Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba (often referred to by his title ‘O Sensei’ or ‘Great Teacher’) a student of Sogaku Takeda, Soke of Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Morihei Ueshiba practiced his art as Daito Ryu and Aiki Budo for many years. His official association with Daito-ryu continued until 1937. However, in those later years, Ueshiba had already begun to distance himself from Takeda and the Daito-ryu. At that time Ueshiba was referring to his martial art as “Aiki Budo.” It is unclear exactly when Ueshiba began using the name “aikido”, but it became the official name of the art in 1942 when the Greater Japan Martial Virtue Society (Dai Nippon Butoku Kai) was engaged in a government sponsored reorganization and centralization of Japanese martial arts. At this time the art of Aikido became uniquely associated with teachings of Morihei Ueshiba.

  On a purely physical level it is an art involving some throws and joint locks that are derived from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu and some throws and other techniques derived from Kenjutsu. Aikido focuses not on punching or kicking opponents, but rather on using their own energy to gain control of them or to throw them away from you. It is not a static art, but places great emphasis on motion and the dynamics of movement.

Aiki-jujutsu is a form that can be broken into three styles: Jujutsu (hard/ soft); Aiki no Jutsu (soft); and Aikijujutsu (soft) which is the combination of the former two. Modern Japanese Jujutsu and Aikido both are styles that originate in Aikijujutsu. It emphasizes “an early neutralization of an attack.” Like other forms of jujutsu, it emphasizes throwing techniques and joint manipulations to effectively control, subdue, or injure an attacker. Of particular importance is the timing of a defensive technique to either blend or neutralize an incoming attack’s effectiveness and use the force of the attacker’s movement against them. Aikijujutsu is characterized by ample use of atemi, or the striking of vital areas, in order to set up jointlocking or throwing tactics.Some of the art’s striking methods employ the swinging of the outstretched arms to create power and to hit with the fists at deceptive angles, as may be observed in techniques such as the atemi that sets up gyaku ude-dori (reverse elbow lock). Many regard one of the unique characteristics of the art to be its preference for controlling a downed attacker’s joints with one’s knee or advanced cramping techniques in order to leave one’s hands free to access one’s weapons or to deal with the threat of other oncoming attackers.

Upon closer examination, most people will find in Aiki related arts what they are looking for, whether it is applicable self-defense technique, spiritual enlightenment, physical health or peace of mind. Aikido emphasizes the moral and spiritual aspects of this art, placing great weight on the development of harmony and peace. “The Way of Harmony of the Spirit” is one way that “Aikido” may be translated into English. Aikijujutsu stresses the combative roots of the modern art. Although different styles emphasize the more spiritual aspects to greater or lesser degrees, all of them are practiced with a spirit of cooperation and respect for ones training partner. The idea of a martial discipline striving for peace and harmony may seem paradoxical, however it is the most basic tenet of the art.

Here at Sakura Budokan we study, research and explore the traditional and modern forms of Aikijujutsu and Aikido through the KNBK and DNBK as well as its original methods through teachers of the Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu Kodokai.